annemariesblog

Author Anne Marie Lutz

My Week in Buildings (Southern Edition)

Spent a lovely week exploring the beautiful historic cities of Savannah, Georgia and Charleston, South Carolina. (With a stop at Tybee Island in between, to enjoy the ocean.)

In Savannah, I heard the story of the seven women who decided in the 1950s to begin the Historic Savannah Foundation, beginning with $22,500 to buy a house in danger of being razed for a parking lot. I wonder if they were taken seriously back then, or if people considered this a hobby? The historic district owes its preservation — and definitely its thriving tourist industry — to the leadership of these women, and those who continued their vision.

 

Entryway to the Isaiah Davenport House

Entryway to the Isaiah Davenport House, now a museum. 

 

Cathedral of St John the Baptist, Savannah - dedicated 1853

Cathedral of St John the Baptist, Savannah – dedicated 1853

 

The Olde Pink House, built in 1771 for cotton merchant James Habersham. Now a restaurant and hotel.

The Olde Pink House, built in 1771 for cotton merchant James Habersham. Now a restaurant and hotel.

 

Childhood home of author Flannery O'Connor. The house dates from the 1850s. O'Connor was born in 1925. There's a Little Free Library in front of the house.

Childhood home of author Flannery O’Connor. The house dates from the 1850s. O’Connor was born in 1925. There’s a Little Free Library in front of the house.

 

Tybee Island Lighthouse, opened 1736, modified in the 1800s.

Tybee Island Lighthouse, opened 1736, modified in the 1800s.

In Charleston, we heard stories of the pirates hanged on the Battery in the 1700s and admired the antebellum homes that line the park. But our visit focused more on the remnants of the Civil War. These buildings stand as a reminder, so we can look back through many years and from another culture to try to understand those times.

Drayton Hall, built 1750s. The family owned slaves.

Drayton Hall, built 1750s. The family owned slaves.

"Leave 'em Rest". African-American Cemetery at Drayton.

Leave ’em Rest” — African-American Cemetery at Drayton.

Slave Mart in Charleston, now a museum about the lives and cultures of those enslaved. It felt odd walking into a building where human beings were once bought and sold.

The Slave Mart in Charleston, in use from 1859 to about 1863. It’s now a museum about the lives and cultures of those enslaved. 

 

Fort Sumter. The fort was the site of 2 battles. The final siege eventually reduced the fort to ruins.

The ruins of Fort Sumter. 

Here are a few links to more information:

Historic Savannah Foundation

Cathedral of St John the Baptist, Savannah (virtual tour)

Flannery O’Connor (Encyclopedia Britannica)

Drayton Hall

Slave Mart (National Park Service link)

Fort Sumter (National Park Service link)

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: